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The Advertising Council and Girl Scouts of the USA Launch Campaign to Encourage Girls in Math, Science, and Technology

Girls Go Tech—"It's Her Future. Do the Math."

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 6, 2003

CONTACT:
Wendy O'Donnell
PT and Co. (for Girl Scouts of the USA)
(212) 229-0500 x258
wodonnell@ptanaka.com

New York, NY—The Advertising Council, in partnership with Girl Scouts of the USA, announced today the launch of a national public service advertising (PSA) campaign designed to encourage girls to develop and maintain an interest in math, science, and technology.

According to the National Science Foundation, women represent 46% of the total workforce, but only 25% of the technology workforce and 10% of the nation's top technology jobs. While girls exhibit early interest and ability in math, science, and technology, recent research suggests that adults tend to discourage girls from persevering in these areas. The new PSA campaign, entitled "Girls Go Tech," seeks to change that tendency, and is part of Girl Scouts' ongoing effort to prepare today's girls to take on the technological opportunities and challenges of the 21st century.

Created pro bono by the Kaplan Thaler Group, the television, radio, print, and Internet PSAs deliver a national call to action for parents and caregivers and other adults to empower girls to embrace math, science, and technology. The objective of the campaign is to persuade key influencers of young girls to change the cultural cues girls typically receive. Girls may lose the opportunity to pursue future jobs when they turn away from math and science. These PSAs motivate influencers to "keep her interest alive."

According to Peggy Conlon, Ad Council President & CEO, "Many Americans subconsciously promote the cycle of cultural cues that dissuade young girls from pursuing an interest in math, science and technology. I am confident that this clever advertising created by the Kaplan Thaler Group will help break the pattern and motivate influencers to recognize their important role in encouraging girls to develop and maintain interests in these areas."

The television and radio PSAs depict humorous interactions between parents and young girls discussing math, science, and technology facts.

"We are thrilled to be in partnership with the Ad Council on this important issue. Girl Scouts of the USA believes every girl deserves the opportunity to learn skills in math, science, and technology, ensuring their future in the 21st century," said Jackie Barnes, Interim CEO of GSUSA. "And we believe that America deserves a diverse, dynamic, and productive workforce that will result when girls are fully vested in these subjects."

Similarly, the print ads depict a young girl with an interest in math, science, and technology. The ad shows a young girl reading a book entitled Charlotte's Web site. Web banners are also available. All of the PSAs direct viewers, listeners, and readers to visit www.girlsgotech.org for more ideas about how to engage young girls in math, science, and technology. The ads end with the campaign tagline, "It's her future. Do the math."

"The campaign uses humor to disrupt and change a behavior among parents to encourage our daughters to become and stay interested in math, science, and technology. By showing how these subjects are an integral part of everyday life, even the simplest of conversations can be an opportunity for parents to address this serious issue," said Linda Kaplan Thaler, CEO and Chief Creative Officer of the Kaplan Thaler Group.

Per the Ad Council's model, all of the PSAs will run and air in advertising time and space that is donated by the media.

About Girl Scouts of the USA

Girl Scouts of the USA is the world's preeminent organization for girls, with a membership of more than 3.8 million girls and adults. Now in its 90th year, GSUSA continues to help cultivate values, social conscience, and self-esteem in young girls, while also teaching them critical life skills that will enable them to succeed as adults. In Girl Scouting—and its special girls-only environment—girls discover the fun, friendship, and power of girls together. 90 Years. Girl Scouts. Still Growing Strong. Visit us at www.girlscouts.org.

The Kaplan Thaler Group

The Kaplan Thaler Group has been ranked by industry publications as the fastest-growing New York advertising agency and touted for its breakthrough creative and immediate results. With billings of $385 million, KTG's clients include Procter & Gamble's Clairol Herbal Essences global brand, among other P&G haircare brands, P&G's Dawn and Swiffer, AFLAC Insurance, Continental Airlines, the American Red Cross, Coldwell Banker, Panasonic, Gruner & Jahr, Pilot Pen, Blimpie Subs & Salads, Villeroy & Boch, and Lane Bryant. KTG is part of the Publicis Groupe, one of the world's largest communications holding companies.

The Advertising Council

The Ad Council is a private, nonprofit organization with a 60-year history of marshalling volunteer talent from the advertising and media industries to deliver critical messages to the American public. The Ad Council has produced thousands of public service campaigns that address the most pressing social issues of the day. Ad Council icons and slogans are woven into the very fabric of American culture—from Smokey the Bear's "Only You Can Prevent Forest Fires" and McGruff the Crime Dog's "Take a Bite out of Crime," to the United Negro College Fund's "A Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Waste" and "Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk." The Ad Council received $1.58 billion in donated advertising time and space from the media last year. To learn more about the Ad Council and its campaigns, visit its Web site, www.adcouncil.org.

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