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Girl Scout Museum

Girl Scouts has been making a difference in the lives of girls since 1912. Just as our membership has grown, so has our place in history.

The Girl Scout National Historic Preservation Center, a department at Girl Scout Headquarters in New York City, includes a Girl Scout Museum and Archives. It was established in 1987┬áto preserve and promote Girl Scout History. The Collection dates back to 1912, the inception of Girl Scouting, has over 60,000 photographs, 7,000 publications, 5,000 periodicals, 650 Girl Scout Uniforms, Ephemera and official records of the National Organization. Our media/audio-visual collection consists of over 600 cubic feet of materials in various formats dating back to 1918.

Girl Scouts of the USA, National Historic Preservation Center, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y., is open to the public Monday - Friday, 9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Visitors to the Girl Scout Museum are encouraged to make arrangements in advance:

We also welcome researchers to access our archive collection, by submitting an application (PDF).

Here's a sampling of items from our museum. Be sure to also see our vintage uniform exhibit.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Girl Scout 1912

Eager to go camping and play basketball, 18 girls in Savannah, Georgia accepted Juliette Low's invitation to join the first troop in 1912. By 1916, membership had expanded to 5,000, uniforms had gone from homemade blue to ready-made khaki, and a Girl Scout handbook had been published. Soon there were local Girl Scout councils, a national training school for Girl Scout leaders, World War I service projects, the publication of a girls' magazine called The American Girl, and the first nationally franchised cookie sale. By era's end, membership was over 400,000.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Doll in Girl Scout Uniform

This 1919 Girl Scout uniform was meticulously handcrafted for the doll. Girl Scouts of the period believed that people would recognize a girl in uniform as courteous, obliging, and willing to help others at all times.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Semaphore Flags

Semaphore flags were used for quick signaling over comparatively short distances. Signaling was one of the requirements for the Second Class rank in the 1920s.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Early Publication

The Rally, a monthly publication for Girl Scouts and their leaders, was launched in 1917 to communicate with a rapidly expanding membership. Renamed The American Girl in 1920, the publication was geared for all girls. It continued to be published until 1979. A separate publication, The Girl Scout Leader (later renamed LEADER magazine), began publication in 1923.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Girl Scout Cover of Life Magazine

Appearing on the cover of Life magazine's November 6, 1924, issue was one of two illustrations by Norman Rockwell that publicized the early Girl Scout organization. The other, also a poster-like image of a Girl Scout in uniform, was for The Literary Digest of October 22, 1921.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Brownie Hat

The Brownie hat, worn during an early experimental Brownie program, featured a hand-painted elf. The bells on the point of the cap indicated that its wearer had passed certain Brownie tests.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

First Girl Scout Handbook

In 1913, W.J. Hoxie, a noted naturalist from Savannah, and Juliette Low prepared an official Girl Scout handbook, How Girls Can Help Their Country, which was adapted from the original handbook for British Girl Guides. Along with information on first aid, housekeeping, and camping, this first U.S. handbook contained instructions on how to stop a runaway horse and how to tie up a burglar "with eight inches of cord."

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Early Proficiency Badges

Of the 26 proficiency badges in the early Girl Scout program, homemaking and nursing were popular, but a girl could also gain recognition for such activities as signaling and telegraphy. Left to right: Needlewoman, Cook, Matron Housekeeping, Signaling.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

1920s Proficiency Badges

With publication of the 1920 Girl Scout handbook, the number of proficiency badges a girl could "win" increased to 47, reflecting the expanding opportunities and challenges for girls. Left to right: Needlewoman, Zoologist, Hostess, Bugler.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

1920 Girl Scout Handbook

Published in 1920, Scouting for Girls was the first handbook prepared by the national organization rather than by Juliette Low. It included sections on map making, sewing an American flag, and marching according to U.S. Infantry drill regulations.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Brownie Insignia, 1926 - 1937

Although experimental in its first 10 years, the Brownie Girl Scout program had its own official Brownie insignia by 1926. Brownies were organized into "Sixes" (patrols), each with its own emblem worn by members and a "Sixer" as the patrol leader. The Golden Bar award represented the golden ground the Brownie stood on, ready to help others, and the Golden Hand award showed that the Brownie could really lend a hand.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Tin Lunch Box

The tin lunch box (circa 1920) depicts favorite Girl Scout activities of the era-camping, outdoor cooking, signaling, and first aid. A Girl Scout was expected to know how to make a stretcher, bandage an injured head or limb, and apply a sterile dressing.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

1925 Girl Scout Annual Report

Girl Scouts' Annual Report for 1925 credited growth of Girl Scouting to its ability to address "the needs of women in this bewildering new world—a world which in olden days only men could enter."

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

World War I Pledge Card

During World War I, Girl Scouts served their country on the home front, using pledge cards to promise to conserve foods "for a soldier." They also marched in parades, served as messengers, hung posters, knitted wool for the Red Cross, participated in scrap metal drives, and preserved jellies and other foods to aid the war effort.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Officers' Pins

In the early years, officers wore the same uniform as girls and wore proficiency badges on their sleeves. A special pin for Girl Scout Captains (leaders) was used as early as 1916. The Lieutenant (assistant leader) also wore the Captain's Pin after passing her First Class tests. A special Lieutenant's Pin was introduced in 1917. Left to right: Captain's Pin, Lieutenant's Pin.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Liberty Loan Medal

In 1918, the nation officially recognized Girl Scouts by awarding them the Liberty Loan Medal for the sale of war bonds. In the third and fourth Liberty Loan Campaigns, Girl Scouts sold 52,729 bonds, amounting to more than $9 million. Girl Scouts selling the requisite number of bonds in both the third and fourth campaigns received the medal along with a rectangular bar on which to hang it.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Liberty Loan Campaign Article

Philadelphia Girl Scouts council announced its participation in a Liberty Loan Campaign in the Girl Scout Messenger, a council newsletter. Local Girl Scout councils worked closely with the national Liberty Loan Committee and were expected to keep the records of Girl Scout activity in their area.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Girl Scout Camera

Whether a Girl Scout was at a parade, in the woods, or at camp, the first official Girl Scout camera (circa 1930) allowed her to permanently record her memories through photographs.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Girl Scout Compass

A Girl Scout in the 1920s used her compass to navigate when hiking or camping. Besides orienteering, nature studies, and other camp craft skills, increasingly popular camp activities widened to include folk dancing, music, pageantry, and dramatics.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

1927 Girl Scout Annual Report

The Girl Scout Trail, Annual Report 1927 makes clear that the basic structure of the Girl Scout Movement was in place:

• A national organization fortified by prominent leadership
• A network of councils providing local support
• Leaders fostering constructive relationships with girls
• An informal educational program
• Troops of enthusiastic girl members participating in a wide range of activities.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Golden Eaglet Award

The Golden Eaglet was the highest award in Girl Scouting from 1918-1939. To receive this award, a girl had to earn a required number of proficiency badges and be judged by the National Standards Committee on her service and character.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

1928 Girl Scout Annual Report

In Broadcasting from Station Girl Scout with Television Pictures: Girl Scout 1928 Annual Report, Jane Deeter Rippin, National Director and radio announcer, declared: "This is Station G.S.—owned and operated by Girl Scouts and their friends, operating on a limitless wave of good fellowship with an unbroken frequency of joy and happiness for girls..."

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Girl Scout Promise And Law Postcards

Medieval illuminated-manuscript-style postcards, drawn by Edith Ballinger Price, depicting the Girl Scout Promise and Law were first produced in 1925 and continued to be sold through 1938.

In the Beginning: 1912-1937

Awarding the Golden Eaglet

One of Juliette Gordon Low's favorite duties was to award the Golden Eaglet in person. "The five requirements for winning the Golden Eaglet," she wrote in The American Girl, "are character, health, handicraft, happiness, and service, and that others will expect to find in our Golden Eaglets a perfect specimen of girlhood: mentally, morally, and physically."

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

In 1938, Girl Scouts began offering a program for three age–levels—Brownie, Intermediate, and Senior Girl Scouts—and introduced a girl-centered approach that allowed girls to better understand themselves and the world. Members participated in the 1939 World's Fair, tended World War II Victory Gardens, and dedicated the Birthplace as a national Girl Scout center. The addition of the Wing Scouts and expansion of the Mariners marked a phase of program enhancement for Senior Girl Scouting that has continued through today.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

1944 Girl Scout Calendar

The 1944 Girl Scout calendar was the first one nationally produced and distributed for council fund-raising. It was developed as an alternative to the sale of Girl Scout Cookies®, which were in short supply at the time because of wartime rationing of essential ingredients.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

1961 Girl Scout Calendar

The 1961 calendar focused on Girl Scouts' anniversary theme "Honor the past. Serve the future." The theme was used from October 31, 1960, the hundredth anniversary of Juliette Low's birth, to the organization's fiftieth anniversary on March 12, 1962.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Girl Scout Statuette

The Girl Scout statuette was sculpted by Marjorie Daingerfield in 1954. From 1954-1973, the statuette was often given to adults in recognition of their service to Girl Scouting.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Aide-to-Voters Armbands

Girl Scouts have traditionally served as Aides to Voters. Armbands (circa 1950) were worn to identify the girls to parents in need of baby-sitting services at the polls.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Brownie Girl Scout Doll

The 1949 Brownie Girl Scout doll wears the uniform of the era. The new program for Brownies became an integral part of the Girl Scout program in 1939.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Girl Scout and Brownie Scout Promise Tiles

Designed by Vera Bock in 1947, the beautiful new setting for the Girl Scout Promise and Brownie Scout Promise was used not only on tiles but on postcards and posters. Both Promises continued to be the basis of the organization's program.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Girl Scouts Buy Defense Stamps

During World War II, Girl Scouts were urged to purchase and save 25-cent Defense Stamps. When girls had collected $18.75 worth, they could exchange the stamps for a $25 Defense Bond.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Brownie Girl Scout Handbook

In 1951, the Brownie Scout Handbook was published. It was the first book for Brownies, rather than for their leaders. From its pages, girls learned how to play the game "run, sheep, run," make handkerchief dolls, and make an aquarium.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

1930s Girl Scout Cookie® Box

The box was produced by a local baker working with a Girl Scout council. The first documented councilwide sale of commercially baked cookies was in Philadelphia in 1934. This fund-raising idea proved so successful that in 1936 Girl Scouts across the country participated in the first nationally franchised cookie sale. Then, as now, cookies were sold by Girl Scouts councils, with all proceeds from the sale remaining in the area where the cookies were sold and benefiting Girl Scouts there.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

World's Fair Girl Scout Souvenirs

The Postcard shows the Girl Scout Chalet especially created for the 1939 New York World's Fair. This building was a miniature replica of Our Chalet, a Girl Guide/Girl Scout world center in Adelboden, Switzerland. The embroidered Girl Scout New York World's Fair patch began the popular trend toward the use of patches to commemorate events.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Camp Equipment Brochure

Girl Scouts found the latest outfits for an active lifestyle in the camp equipment brochure. Every Girl Scout wanted to hike, explore new places, cook outdoors, and go to camp. She wanted to live comfortably out-of-doors, feel at home in the woods, and enjoy nature. More than a quarter of a million Girl Scouts had camp experiences in 1944.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace Model

The ceramic model depict the Regency-style house that was the birthplace and childhood home of U.S. Girl Scouts' founder Juliette Gordon Low. It was dedicated as a national program center and living memorial to her in 1956 and was declared a national historic landmark in 1965.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace Postcard

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace Postcard
The postcard depict the Regency-style house that was the birthplace and childhood home of U.S. Girl Scouts' founder Juliette Gordon Low. It was dedicated as a national program center and living memorial to her in 1956 and was declared a national historic landmark in 1965.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Juliette Gordon Low Stamp

In 1948 a three-cent commemorative stamp honoring Juliette Low was issued by the United States Post Office. It was first sold at the Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace in Savannah, Georgia, on October 29. That date was proclaimed Juliette Low Day in Savannah and celebrated throughout the city.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Girl Scouts' Fiftieth Anniversary Stamp

In 1962 a four-cent stamp was issued in honor of the Girl Scouts' 50th anniversary on March 12. Also commemorating the anniversary was the "Blossoms for Birthday Years" project, which featured a specially developed Girl Scout Rose and Brownie Scout Marigold in bloom across the country.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Volunteers for Victory Publication

A 1941 pamphlet for Girl Scout volunteers, Volunteers for Victory, sought to enlist adults as leaders and encourage them to make Girl Scouting part of their wartime job. During World War II, program efforts were focused on skills involving community service: child care, communicating messages, making and collecting clothing, and preparing and preserving food within the confines of wartime restrictions.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Victory Gardens Booklet

A how-to publication for Girl Scouts concerned about wartime food shortages, Victory Gardens describes how girls can enhance their family's food supply by growing their own food. Brownie, Intermediate, and Senior Girl Scouts tended Victory Gardens in camps, in their communities, and at home. During summer and harvest months, girls were busy weeding, cultivating, spraying, and picking crops.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

Curved Bar Patch and Pin

The Curved Bar was the highest award in Girl Scouting from 1940 until 1963. Open only to First Class Girl Scouts, it served as a bridge to Senior Girl Scouting. The embroidered arc patch was used at first because of metal shortage during the war. The Curved Bar pin, introduced in the fall of 1947, was used until 1963, when the award was discontinued.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

1947 Girl Scout Handbook

The new Girl Scout Handbook, published in 1947, was prepared with input from Girl Scouts across the country. It featured a new focus on agriculture, with badges such as Poultry Raiser, Truck Gardener, and Beekeeper.

Widening the Scope of the Girl Scout Program: 1938-1962

1945 Senior Girl Scouting Handbook

Senior Girl Scouting, published in 1945, was the first complete Senior Girl Scout handbook. New projects were added, such as Occupational Therapist's Aide and Office and Library Aide.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Now with program for four age–levels, Girl Scouting continued its care of the environment, spearheading the National Youth Conference on Natural Beauty and Conservation in the sixties and launching Eco-Action, a nationwide environmental education and improvement program, in the seventies. Attention to issues like the drug problem and the urban crisis also increased. Bringing Native Americans, daughters of migrant workers, and underserved urban populations into the Girl Scout fold in large numbers expanded membership diversity, as the three-year "Piper Project" increased overall membership.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Brownie Girl Scout Handbook and Beanie

The handbook featured Brownie games like "Let's pretend," and other new activities that stretched the Brownies Girl Scout's imagination. Activities developed for this age–level were designed to appeal to curiosity, creativity, and helpfulness. The beanie, made of felt, displays the Brownie elf.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Junior Girl Scout Handbook and Beret

Junior Girl Scout activities described in the handbook were developed to guide skill growth in a variety of areas. Badges were aimed at exploration rather than concentration in a given skill. The beret was made of wool.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Cadette Girl Scout Handbook and Beret

The Cadette Girl Scout Handbook emphasized the four challenges and new activities developed to provide a wide array of experiences. Proficiency badges required intensive work in particular areas of specialization. The Cadette Girl Scout beret featured a cockade—a fluted red, white, and green grosgrain ribbon-on the "GS" emblem.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Senior Girl Scout Handbook and Hat

Activities suggested in the handbook allowed Senior Girl Scouts to acquire and test social, recreational, and vocational skills that the authors thought girls would need as adults. The hat has an embroidered Senior emblem and yellow cord trimming. Hat cord colors indicated a troop's major program interest, with yellow representing the multifocused "panorama" emphasis. Girls also showed their troop's interest by wearing matching-color ties and displaying interest patches on their uniform.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Book on Girl Scouts With Disabilities

The publication of Handicapped Girls & Girl Scouting in 1968 continued the tradition of Girl Scouts' concern for the disabled, begun in 1917, when the first troop of physically disabled girls in the United States was organized. Girl Scouting offers girls with disabilities an opportunity to participate in fun activities with other girls their own age and helps give them confidence in their abilities.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Book on Community Service Activities

Girl Scouting Is an Initiating Social Force, published in 1971, suggested projects for Girl Scouts of all levels to serve the community, help children with learning problems, provide recreation for inner-city and migrant children, and explore ways to deal with race relations, drug abuse, and pollution.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Girl Scout Records

Music plays an important part in Girl Scouting. Songs from the Girl Scout Senior Roundups was produced in 1965, following the last of four Senior Girl Scout Roundups (special encampments for girls aged 14-17) held between 1956 and 1965. Actress Debbie Reynolds recorded "Follow the Piper" as part of the Piper Project, a major membership retention and extension plan Girl Scouts initiated in 1966. The project sought to ensure continuity of troop leadership, adequate troop size, and extension of Girl Scouting to new members.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

World Friendship Medal

The Juliette Low World Friendship Medal was first awarded in 1977 in recognition of outstanding efforts to extend opportunities for international understanding through Girl Scouting. It had been cast for the fiftieth anniversary of the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund. The medal could be awarded to a Senior Girl Scout, adult volunteer, staff member, or national or local organization.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Girl Scout Knife and Flashlight

Girl Scouts used the knife and flashlight during camping and other outdoor activities, which continued to be girls' favorites. The knife was helpful for whittling, slicing vegetables, and cutting sticks for toasting marshmallows.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Girl Scout Medals Designed by Norman Rockwell

In 1977, the Franklin Mint, in cooperation with Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., issued a collection of 12 medals designed by Norman Rockwell. The sterling silver medals' designs focused on the ideals of the Girl Scout movement, as expressed in the Girl Scout Promise, Law, and motto.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

American Revolution Bicentennial Girl Scout Merchandise

Two official patches were issued to commemorate the American Revolution Bicentennial in 1976 and Girl Scouts celebrated our nation's two-hundredth anniversary by dedicating themselves to community service. Girl Scout celebrations for the bicentennial included finding "Hidden Heroines"—past and contemporary women of achievement—to foster self-awareness in girls through identification with outstanding women.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

First Class Patch and Challenge Pins

First Class was the highest award in Girl Scouting from 1963-1980. To receive the award, a Cadette Girl Scout had to earn several badges and meet four challenges, each of which was recognized with a pin. A challenge was a selected real-life situation designed to test a girl's ability to use knowledge and skill based on Girl Scout ideals and values.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Environmental Activity Guide

Eco-Antics, published in 1974, suggested activities that would enable girls to fully understand the web of environmental relationships and come away with an awareness of the interdependence of all life forms. The book supported Eco-Action, a nationwide environmental education and improvement program begun in 1970.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Junior Girl Scout Doll

In 1968, for the first time, as part of the Girl Scouts' continuing efforts to reach out to girls from diverse backgrounds, the organization offered for sale two official Black dolls—one for Junior Girl Scouts and another for Brownie Girl Scouts.

Program and Membership Expansion: 1963-1976

Junior and Cadette Girl Scout Badges

Under the new program introduced in 1963, the old Intermediate Girl Scout badges were divided into two groups to fit the interests and abilities of Junior and Cadette Girl Scouts. Junior Girl Scout badges (green borders) were aimed at exploration, rather than concentration on any given skill. Cadette Girl Scout badges (yellow borders) emphasized intensive work in particular areas of specialization. Left to right: Junior Girl Scout Observer, Cadette Girl Scout Radio and Television, Junior Magic Carpet, Cadette Traveler.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

The Girl Scout Program's Worlds to Explore concept featured activities grouped in five "worlds of interest" and stressed deepening self-awareness, developing values, and contributing to society. From Dreams to Reality encouraged career exploration in fields recently opened to women. Activities for all Girl Scout age–levels focused on issues such as drug abuse prevention, literacy, pluralism, and health and fitness. Also debuting during this period were a new Daisy Girl Scout age–level for five-year-olds in 1984, National Centers for Innovation, and adoption of a contemporary logo.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Worlds To Explore: Program Symbols

Introduced in 1977, the "Worlds to Explore" approach to the Girl Scout Program grouped activities into five interest areas. In the World of Well-Being, Girl Scouts focused on fitness and fighting drug abuse. Girls learned to appreciate differences in the World of People. They investigated science and high-tech careers in the World of Today and Tomorrow, and discovered visual and performing arts in the World of the Arts. The World of the Out-of-Doors gave new meaning to environmental concerns in an age of gasoline shortages and world food problems.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Daisy and Cadette/Senior Girl Scout Uniform Components and Recognitions

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

Daisy Girl Scouts, named in honor of Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low, wore a blue tunic and a Daisy Girl Scout pin. The Daisy Girl Scout age–level, for girls five years old or in kindergarten, was officially launched in October 1984, after more than 10 years of study. In 1980, colorful interest project patches were introduced for Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts. Girls received these patches for work in such diverse areas as energy awareness, career exploration, marine biology, auto mechanics, and outdoor survival.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women. Interior Designer career card.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women. Forester career card.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women. Astronaut career card.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women. Director of a Multicultural Affairs Organization career card.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Career Education Materials

The From Dreams to Reality careers packet was published in 1978. The activity book and deck of 95 career cards were developed to help Cadette and Senior Girl Scouts explore and practice skills and abilities. Girl Scout resources for girls and their leaders pointed out the many options now available for women. Dentist career card.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Games

The Brownie Girl Scout Try-It Game featured Try-It patches, noncompetitive recognitions received by Brownie Girl Scouts to symbolize participation, not performance, in selected activities. The Game of Junior Girl Scouting had traditional badges with a contemporary focus. Familiar topics such as Outdoor Cook, Hiker, and Home Living were joined by Computer Fun, Aerospace, and Business-Wise.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Contemporary Issues Booklets and Paperweight

The Contemporary Issues booklets were developed to deal with topics not covered in the handbooks or to explore certain topics in depth in response to expressed needs for resources on current interests of girls. In a concise format, each booklet contained general information on the topic, suggested activities for girls, and a resource section.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Companion Patches for Contemporary Issues Booklets

Each Contemporary Issues booklet had an associated patch displaying a shortened version of the booklet title. Brownie to Senior Girl Scouts who participated in activities described in the booklet received the patch.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scouts' 75th Anniversary Paperweight

The commemorative paperweight was produced in observance of Girl Scouts' 75th Anniversary, celebrated in 1987, with "Tradition with a Future" as its theme. The worldwide Promise Circle ceremony held by U.S. Girl Scouts on this occasion was led from Washington, D.C., by First Lady and Girl Scout Honorary President Nancy Reagan and Girl Scout National President Betty F. Pilsbury.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Gold Award

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest award that can be earned by a Girl Scout, honors girls who demonstrate an exceptional commitment to their communities and an outstanding dedication to achievement. To receive the award, a Senior Girl Scout must earn seven other recognitions and plan and carry out a Girl Scout Gold Award project, which requires at least 50 hours of work. Gold Award recipients are eligible for special college scholarships, are officially recognized by the United States government, and have preferred status when applying for jobs with many prospective employers.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Report on Trends Affecting U.S. Girl Scouting

Published in 1987, the first Environmental Scanning Report was a compilation of information about the external environment, with implications for Girl Scouting in the United States. The report, which was updated during the 1980s and 1990s, was a valuable resource for local Girl Scout councils and the national organization.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Report on Diversity in Girl Scouting

The Impact of Minority Presence in Girl Scouting on White and Minority Communities, a cooperative study by Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. and National Urban League, was released in 1981. It indicated that U.S. racial/ethic groups had an overwhelmingly favorable opinion of Girl Scouting and its efforts to increase participation by individuals from different backgrounds. In 1993, GSUSA commissioned Strength in Diversity: Toward a Broader Understanding of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Girl Scouting, a study designed to help expand outreach to underserved communities.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Magnetic Compass

The Girl Scout magnetic compass ensures that a Girl Scout will "find her way" wherever she may be. Orienteering has always been a part of the Girl Scout program.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Trefoil Merchandise

The Girl Scout magnet (shown only in the museum case), knife, and wristwatch were three of the Girl Scout products the National Equipment Service sold bearing the redesigned trefoil. The trefoil was introduced in 1978 as part of a campaign to acquaint the public with Girl Scouting's contemporary identity.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Cookie® Boxes

Girl Scout Cookie boxes continue to serve as familiar and convenient vehicles for telling the story of contemporary Girl Scouting. Today, as in the past, the skills Girl Scouts learn by participating in the cookie sale help them prepare for their future in the business world.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Recognitions Aboard a U.S. Space Shuttle

The Aerospace Proficiency Badge, membership pin, and Global Understanding Interest Project Patch were flown aboard the United States Space Shuttle Discovery on April 12-19, 1985. Launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Discovery completed 109 orbits and traveled 2.5 million miles before landing. M. Rhea Seddon, a former Girl Scout, was the mission specialist.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Sparkler

The Girl Scout sun sparkler carries the redesigned trefoil. The three faces symbolize the diversity of Girl Scouting and its focus on girls, as well as both the contemporary and continuing commitment to the three-part Promise.

Worlds to Explore: 1977-1997

Girl Scout Publications in Spanish

Algo Especial Para Su Hija (Something special for your daughter) was produced in the late 1970s-along with ┬┐Saben Tu Y tu Familia Lo Que Hacen Las Girl Scouts? (Do you and your family know what Girl Scouts do?) as a means of reaching Hispanic populations. These recruitment fliers were two of the many publications translated into Spanish.

Twenty-first Century and Beyond

Girl Scout Publications in Spanish

As Girl Scouting looks forward to the future, the organization is focused on renewed efforts to serve all girls. With the increased demographic diversity in the twenty-first century, Girl Scouting will go on playing a key role in helping girls learn to live together harmoniously. Committed to meeting the unique needs of girls, the organization will continue to offer them opportunities for exploring new career paths. And it will keep preparing them for expanded roles in a changing society while holding on to the timeless values that have made the Girl Scout experience rich and meaningful for all girls.

Twenty-first Century and Beyond

Daisy, Brownie, Junior Girl Scout Uniforms

Girl Scouting in the 21st century got off to a running start with new resources and programs that continue to address the needs of girls and help ensure that Girl Scouting will be available for every girl, everywhere. Girl Scouts of the USA published brand-new resources and designed contemporary uniforms for all Girl Scouts. Photo of new Girl Scout uniforms.

Twenty-first Century and Beyond

Girls 11-17

Girl Scouts are developing new programs and collaborations to work with girls and address today's top issues, including violence prevention, use of technology, and adjustment to life in a fast-changing world. The organization launched the Girl Scout Research Institute, which solidifies Girl Scouts role as an authority on the development of girls. The first honorary congressional Girl Scout troop—Troop Capitol Hill—formed, with membership composed of a bipartisan delegation of women in Congress who act in partnership with Girl Scouts to address issues affecting girls and young women.