[X] CLOSE

Girl Scouts of the USA Launches 'ToGetHerThere', the Largest Advocacy and Fundraising Campaign Dedicated to Girls' Leadership in History

New Research Shows Girls are Looking for Leadership Role Models; Cause Launches as Girl Scouts Celebrates its 100th Anniversary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 31, 2012

Media Contacts:
Michelle Tompkins
Girl Scouts of the USA
mtompkins@girlscouts.org

Theresa Pantazopoulos
Edelman
theresa.pantazopoulos@edelman.com

New York, N.Y. — Girl Scouts of the USA today announced the launch of ToGetHerThere, the largest, boldest advocacy and fundraising cause dedicated to girls' leadership in the nation's history. The multiyear effort will seek to create balanced leadership — the equal representation of women in leadership positions in all sectors and levels of society — within one generation.

A comprehensive new research study, "ToGetHerThere: Girls' Insights on Leadership," commissioned by Girl Scouts in partnership with GFK Roper, reveals that while girls are generally optimistic about their futures, they still see glass ceilings in today's society that will get in the way of achieving their leadership potential. The study, based on a telephone survey of 1,000 girls aged 8-17, found that close to three in five girls think that a woman can rise up in a company but will only rarely be put in a senior leadership role. Additionally, more than one-third of girls say they would not feel comfortable trying to be a leader, while almost 40 percent are not sure if they are cut out to be a leader.

"It is abundantly clear that our girls have a vision of their leadership potential that is incompatible with what we know they can achieve," says Anna Maria Chávez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA. "The ToGetHerThere campaign is the launch of a cause to impact our girls now, so that we can inspire them to achieve leadership roles in all aspects of society."

Girl Scouts has launched a $1 billion philanthropic campaign for girls to fuel this effort, and to fund opportunities that enable girls to lead. Ninety percent of funds raised will go directly to services and programs for girls across the nation and in 94 countries globally to help fill critical talent gaps in finance, science, technology, environmental, and global leadership arenas.

The ToGetHerThere cause formally begins the work of breaking down the barriers that are keeping girls from reaching their potential as leaders. The cause will seek to motivate all adult members of society — individuals, corporations, governments, and like-minded organizations — to do their part to support girls.   Further, the cause will place this issue front and center on the national agenda. Adults who want to support the cause can visit www.ToGetHerThere.org for tools on how to be a part of this important movement.

Obstacles to Leadership from a Girl's Point of View
A crucial reason for girls' distorted outlook on leadership may have something to do with what they see as environments that are unsupportive of women leaders. The ToGetHerThere study noted that 81 percent of girls believe the workplace could do a better job of meeting the needs of female employees, and the majority of girls also believe family responsibilities weigh women down more than men as they attempt to advance in their careers.

"Our ToGetHerThere study found that while most girls are positive that they want to lead, a startling 59 percent of them say that it is easier to be a follower than to stand out as leader," says Connie Lindsey, National President, Girl Scouts of the USA. "And as our own research from Girl Scout Research Institute demonstrates, negative influences such as stress, fear of speaking in front of others, appearing bossy, and peer pressure may cause girls to simply disengage from assuming leadership roles. We need to change that, and ToGetHerThere is a bold step in the right direction."

On Tuesday, January 31 in New York City, Girl Scouts will kick off ToGetHerThere with a panel discussion at the TimesCenter featuring female leaders across a number of industries, including finance, media, non-profit and sports. At that time, Girl Scouts will be further sharing the findings of "ToGetHerThere: Girls' Insights on Leadership."

Taking the Message to Capitol Hill
Following the panel discussion at the TimesCenter in New York City, on Wednesday, February 1, Girl Scouts will host an event on Capitol Hill, in the Cannon Caucus room, focusing on the ToGetHerThere cause as an advocacy program for girls. Girl Scouts will be asking Congressional leaders to join them in supporting efforts to foster leadership in all girls, both nationally and in their respective constituencies.

About Girl Scouts
Founded in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls with 3.2 million girl and adult members worldwide. Girl Scouts is the leading authority on girls' healthy development, and builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. The organization serves girls from every corner of the United States and its territories. Girl Scouts of the USA also serves American girls and their classmates attending American or international schools overseas in 90 countries. For more information on how to join, volunteer, reconnect, or donate to Girl Scouts, call (800) GSUSA 4 U or visit www.girlscouts.org.

About GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications
GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications is a division of GfK Custom Research North America. The group specializes in customized public affairs and public opinion polling, media and corporate communications research, and corporate reputation measurement in the U.S. and globally. About the survey: Telephone interviews were completed with 1,001 girls, aged 8-17. Adult parents or caregivers were first reached to obtain permission to interview their daughter, and adults completed the household demographic portion of the questionnaire. The interview was approximately 20 minutes in length. A few questions were asked only of teen girls. Interviews were conducted between Dec. 6-22, 2011.

###