A Girl Scout has fun exploring nature

Girl Scouts and the Environment

When you’re a Girl Scout, it’s easy to be green.

It’s in our DNA. Our founder, Juliette Gordon Low, was a famous lover of nature. Today, Girl Scouts honors her legacy by promoting respect and love of the great outdoors far and wide.

Through Girl Scouting, girls see the Earth as their home. Whether they're learning about endangered wildlife, developing creative recycling projects, or working toward a grade-level award, girls focus on care, conservation, and responsibility. They make sure the beauty and wonder of our planet endure for future generations to enjoy.

We inspire girls to develop a lasting commitment to the environment with:

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Girl Scout Journeys

Packed with the latest information and girl-relevant environmental thinking, the It's Your Planet—Love It! Journey series helps girls learn about environmental issues such as clean water and air, noise pollution, global change, soil contamination, and agriculture.


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Girl Scout Camping

Camping is a great way for girls to gain a deep appreciation for nature—while they develop leadership and social skills. Girls can enjoy a traditional camp experience or attend day, resident, weekend, travel, or minimal-impact camp and outdoor adventures. Find a camp.


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The Girl Scout Ranger Program

This exciting new program connects girls with National Park Service sites throughout the United States, including monuments, seashores, and urban landmarks.

To participate, girls and troops can visit the National Park Service website to find a park near their home, explore the history of the park, and learn about its natural and cultural resources. Troop leaders and parents can arrange for activities like hiking, biking, wildlife watching, and guided interpretive tours. The Girl Scout Ranger Program also allows girls to build their own unique park experience, earning badges and patches along the way. Get details.


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Read the Report

More Than S'mores:  Successes and Surprises in Girl Scouts' Outdoor Experiences  highlights findings from a 2012 national study of Girl Scout Juniors and Cadettes. The report explores two basic questions: How and how much are girls getting outside in Girl Scouts? And what difference do these outdoor experiences make? Among key findings are that girls' outdoor experiences in Girl Scouts are positively linked to their challenge seeking, problem solving, and environmental leadership. Find out more.

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