Educators and Girl Scouts: Stronger Together

Why You Should Volunteer with Girl Scouts Today

Girl Scouts complements the indispensable work you do as an educator every day.

In fact, research shows that Girl Scouts are more likely than non–Girl Scouts to achieve academic excellence, and overachieve when it comes to team work, hands-on learning and reflection, and decision making. That’s because Girl Scouts understands the vital connection between young girls’ development and their future success, and offers a one-of-a-kind, proven leadership development program that pairs girls with strong, caring role models and mentors like you, who prepare them to take the lead from age 5 to 18, and into adulthood.

Our ready-to-implement, flexible, and customizable programming exposes girls to so many things—like science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM); entrepreneurship; life skills; financial literacy; and outdoor experiences—in the safe, all-girl environment of a Girl Scout troop, where they can try new things, develop a range of skills, take on leadership roles, and feel comfortable failing, dusting themselves off, and trying again!

So who better than you to guide, mentor, and cheer her on as she unlocks her G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader) potential to accomplish amazing things? As an educator, you already know what she needs to shine and thrive in every aspect of her life. Your knowledge, experience, patience, and passion for learning will change her life—and she’ll change yours. Think of Girl Scouts as a unique new way to build meaningful relationships with students and parents!

There are several different ways to get involved. You could:

  • Become a troop leader.
  • Help out at a one-day community event.
  • Speak to a troop about your area of expertise.

And so much more!

Opportunities will differ by council and location. 


Our Collaboration with the National Education Association

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) has teamed up with the National Education Association (NEA) to provide members with easy-to-access educator resources and volunteer opportunities with local Girl Scout councils. After all, we’re the perfect fit! Both Girl Scouts and educators are deeply committed to girls’ education and development, and your distinctive expertise and experience will make a world of difference to girls in your area. Let’s build a better world for girls and for all of us, together.

Learn how Girl Scout programming meets state and national curriculum standards, and check out an important message from GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo about why the partnership between Girl Scouts and educators is so important to support girls’ success.

 A Shared Purpose: Girl Scouts and Educators Build the Next Generation of Trailblazers

Not an NEA Member? Volunteer here.


More Learning, More Outcomes:
Welcome Girl Scouts into Your School Today

We invite you to work with your local Girl Scout council to bring the power of Girl Scouting to your school by offering space, allowing us to distribute information to girls and parents, facilitating Girl Scouts representation at school functions, or encouraging parents to volunteer with us. There are so many ways to be part of the impact!

The unique benefits for girls, and the seamless way in which our program and yours work together to maximize outcomes are just two of the many reasons to get involved. Check out this helpful resource to learn more.

Girl Scouts in Action

Hear for yourself. Find out what educators are saying about Girl Scouts—learn how Brownies are already changing the world and get to know some of Girl Scouts’ most necessary and passionate assets: our inspiring volunteers!

Building Our Future, One Initiative at a Time

Learn how we’re shaping confident, successful young women through initiatives related to STEM, bullying prevention, and environmental stewardship.

 


National research from the Girl Scout Research Institute.

A leader in analyzing girls’ issues and the benefits of Girl Scouting, the Girl Scout Research is on the forefront of data about girls’ well-being:


For the most up-to-date information, visit the Girl Scout Research Institute.

The NEA encourages members and educators to get involved with their local Girl Scout troop.